On3legs | Photography Tip 6 of 10
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Photography Tip 6 of 10

Tip #6: Use Aperture to your advantage

This photography tip is sort of related to tip number one, understanding exposure, but I’m going to give you a couple tips about understanding aperture. Aperture is a fantastic tool for creativity. I shoot a lot of my images in Aperture Priority, in fact 90% of the time my camera is in this mode. I will adjust the aperture based on what it is I want in the image.

 

aperture trio

 

For example a large aperture, (a low f-number) is great for isolating a subject. If I’m shooting a portrait of somebody I would use a large aperture. One of the effects of a large aperture is the reduction in the depth of field, the larger the aperture, (the lower the f-number), the smaller the depth of field. Once your subject is in focus, your subject will be nice and crisp and sharp, but your background will be out of focus, it will be blurry which makes the subject stand out (this blur is known as BOKEH). A large aperture is sometimes referred to as a ‘Wide’ Aperture.

On the other hand, If I’m shooting landscape and I want everything in focus then I will go for a smaller aperture (higher f-number, narrower aperture), so I might shoot at an F11 to try and get everything in focus in my image. By understanding how to use aperture you can start to be more creative in your photography.

Todays iCandy – Please be Seated

Here’s another from my trip to the old tram shed in Loftus. This was one of the old buses they had. I remember riding on these buses as a kid. I love these locations because they really work well with HDR.

HDR Photography

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