On3legs | Why use HDR?
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Why use HDR?

HDR Photography is fast becoming very popular!

The irony of HDR is I believe the negative feeling or perception of HDR is due to the software companies own ghastly presets and marketing their product as a one stop shop! Having said that though, I also believe that a vast majority of photographers trying their hand at HDR are newer photographers. That is to say that the more seasoned photographers (And I am generalising here) are more likely to have negative feelings towards HDR.

The reality is that it would be a rare occasion that just HDR processing on it’s own will deliver great results. That is why I use photoshop as my final ‘finishing touches’ (you can read about my HDR Process HERE)

So why use HDR?

HDR stands for High Dynamic Range. At some stage I am going to have to do more research as I am interested in learning more. From my brief research, I have learnt that the human eye can capture 3 to 4 more times the dynamic range than the camera sensor can. And our eyes send the info to our brains, and our brain is responsible for picking the best ‘pixels’ for the final image to make sure we see as much as possible. How many times have you been watching a sunset and you excitedly take photos only to be disappointed with the result? Me too… so when I discovered HDR I was hooked!

Today’s iCandy – Harbour Arch

Why use HDR? This photo is a classic example of why I use HDR. I stood inside this sandstone structure by the harbour and the detail was amazing… the view was “oh wow” and I wanted to capture every aspect of the light, the detail and convey a sense of standing there. To get enough light information to complete this image took 7 exposures. The first was at -3ev, and it captured the bright, brights… and the last exposure was +3ev, and that captured detail inside the sandstone structure I was standing in… the end result… one of the most popular images I have processed HDR to date… enjoy!

Why Use HDR?

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